Indigenous Voices at the Intersection of Environmental & Social Justice Podcast Series

ABOUT

The podcast series, Indigenous Voices at the Intersection of Environmental & Social Justice, is a collection of interviews by Anna Steltenkamp. The series seeks to decolonize and diversify the voice of media by prioritizing the voices of Indigenous leaders, as well as Indigenous-led organizations and initiatives, that are working to achieve environmental and social justice within their own communities and throughout the world. 

 

THE SERIES

 “The Condor & The Eagle”: Indigenous Voices in Independent Media Work 

HMM producer Anna Steltenkamp speaks with “The Condor & The Eagle” film’s co-director, Clement Guerra. In this segment, Clement speaks about “The Condor & The Eagle” film’s Global Impact Campaign and the use of independent media work as an impact tool, as well as the importance of Indigenous voices in the global fight for environmental and social justice. Listen in to learn about the significance of cultural frameworks and personal reflection for successful action in the fight for climate justice—as well as the necessity of listening to the Indigenous voices who are leading the fight.

 

“The Condor & The Eagle”: Co-Director Clement Guerra’s Personal & Creative Journey During Production

HMM producer Anna Steltenkamp continues speaking with “The Condor & The Eagle” film’s co-director, Clement Guerra. In this segment, Clement speaks about his personal and creative journey throughout the production of “The Condor & The Eagle” and the implementation of the film’s Global Impact Campaign. Listen in to learn how an idea to create a 10-minute video led to a two-year, trans-continental journey documenting the global impact of four well-known Indigenous leaders in the fight for climate justice.

 

A Dialogue with Bryan Parras: The Path to Achieve Harmony in the World & Balance with the Earth 

HMM producer Anna Steltenkamp speaks with Bryan Parras. Bryan Parras is one of the Gulf Coast’s most dynamic environmental justice organizers, fighting along the entire central and eastern United States. He is the co-founder of Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services and Sierra Club’s Beyond Dirty Fuels campaign—and he is one of the protagonists in the film, “The Condor & the Eagle.”

This is the first segment in a three-part dialogue with Bryan Parras. In this segment, Bryan speaks about his personal efforts in the fight for environmental justice, his role in “The Condor & the Eagle,” and how collective action is necessary to achieve harmony in the world and balance with the Earth.

 

A Dialogue with Bryan Parras: Indigenous Voices & Healing Amidst the Fight for Environmental Justice

This is the second segment in a three-part dialogue with Bryan Parras. In this segment, Bryan speaks about the importance of people telling their own stories, the need for especially local media to change towards greater inclusivity, and the healing practices Indigenous communities use to cope with the environmental issues they face.

 
A Dialogue with Bryan Parras: When We Help Those Least Empowered, Everyone Benefits
This is the third segment in a three-part dialogue with Bryan Parras. In this segment, Bryan speaks about the importance of changing the narrative about those who are affected by environmental racism and how when we help those least empowered, everyone benefits. Further, he addresses how those in a privileged position can contribute to the fight for environmental justice in a respectful and inclusive manner.
 
 
Revitalizing Native American Cuisine: A Dialogue with Chef Sean Sherman of the Sioux Chef & NĀTIFS 

HMM producer Anna Steltenkamp speaks with Chef Sean Sherman about his efforts to revitalize Native American cuisine. Chef Sean Sherman is the Founder of the company The Sioux Chef and the Co-Founder of the organization North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems (NāTIFS). Sean speaks about the importance of food for Native American identities, for the reclamation of Native American ancestral education, and for the well-being of both Native American communities and the environments wherein they reside.

 

Seeding Sovereignty: Redefining ‘Expertise’ in the Environmental Movement

HMM producer Anna Steltenkamp speaks with Janet MacGillivray, the Founder and Executive Director of Seeding Sovereignty. Seeding Sovereignty is a multi-generational, Indigenous womxn-led collective that works to decolonize social and environmental paradigms.

This is the first segment in a multi-part dialogue with Janet MacGillivray. In this segment, Janet speaks about the need to ‘de-expert’ and diversify the environmental movement so that the voices of those directly impacted by social and environmental issues are heard. She addresses how we must redefine our understanding of ‘expertise’—recognizing that those directly impacted have their own ‘expertise’—if the environmental movement is to be both inclusive and successful.

 

Seeding Sovereignty: The Importance of Indigenous Knowledge Systems & Multi-Generational Stewardship

This is the second segment in a multi-part dialogue with Janet MacGillivray. In this segment, Janet speaks about the importance of Seeding Sovereignty’s multi-generational approach and elaborates on how Indigenous practices are in synchronicity with the land. Further, she addresses how COVID-19 has exposed systems of racism, economic oppression, and speciesism present within our society—and the necessity of seeking alternatives that are informed by nature and by a regenerative philosophy.

 

Seeding Sovereignty: An Indigenous-Led Effort to Transform the Colonial-Capitalist Farming Industry

This is the third segment in a multi-part dialogue with Janet MacGillivray. In this segment, Janet speaks specifically about Seeding Sovereignty’s Land Resilience Project. She addresses how the profit-driven, industrial agriculture system is detrimental to environments, communities, and the workers within the industry—and she emphasizes how COVID-19 has exacerbated these negative consequences. Further, she explains her vision for a regenerative food system and how Indigenous ecological knowledge and land practices are essential for this transformation.
 

Papscanee Island: Sacred Land of the Mohican Nation Threatened by the E-37 Pipeline 

HMM producer Anna Steltenkamp speaks with Heather Bruegl, the Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community of the Mohican Nation. The Indigenous peoples of the upper Hudson Valley are the Mohican people, derived from their name for the Hudson River, the Mahhicannituck, the “waters that are never still.” Today known as the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, the Tribal Nation is based in Wisconsin, far from their original homelands. However, the Stockbridge-Munsee Community maintains a close connection to its cultural sites.

Heather Bruegl discusses the historical and present-day cultural significance of Papscanee Island. Papscanee Island is located in the Hudson River just south of Albany, New York. It is perhaps the best preserved known late woodland Native village site in New York, and the entire island is nominated for the National Register of Historic Places due to its Mohican cultural significance. Further, Heather addresses how the installation of National Grid’s proposed E-37 natural gas pipeline threatens to negatively impact Papscanee Island, and she explains the role that the Stockbridge-Munsee Community has taken throughout the decision-making process to protect the island’s rich cultural heritage.

 

Papscanee Island: The Stockbridge-Munsee Community’s Continued Efforts to Protect Their Sacred Lands

HMM producer Anna Steltenkamp speaks again with Heather Bruegl, the Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community of the Mohican Nation. Heather continues her discussion of the cultural significance of Papscanee Island and the Stockbridge-Munsee Community’s efforts to protect their sacred lands. Heather addresses the most recent developments in the proposed Pipeline E-37 case, including the Pipeline E-37 Resolution that was approved by the Tribal Council of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community on August 18, 2020.

To learn more about Papscanee Island and the proposed Pipeline E-37, and to support the Stockbridge-Munsee Community’s preservation efforts, visit: papscanee.org

 

 

PEOPLE

Anna Steltenkamp began working with the Sanctuary for Independent Media in Summer 2020. Anna is a member of the University Scholars Program at Duke University, studying Cultural Anthropology, Environmental Sciences & Policy, and Documentary Studies. During her undergraduate career, she has studied abroad in Berlin, Germany and Sydney, Australia.

Her primary research interests are sustainability and equity in the food system; veganism and industrial animal agriculture; Indigenous ecological knowledge and BIPOC-led environmental activism; and efforts to combat environmental racism through biocultural restoration. At Duke University, she currently conducts ethnographic research at the Duke Campus Farm and works as an Equity Through Stories Researcher at the Sarah P. Duke Gardens on the inclusion of local Indigenous peoples & their knowledge systems.

At the Sanctuary, Anna works as a host and producer for the Sanctuary’s radio show, the Hudson Mohawk Magazine (HMM). Her interviews for HMM primarily address BIPOC-centered efforts to achieve environmental sustainability and social equity. Anna has also created the site, papscanee.org, in collaboration with the Stockbridge-Munsee community of the Mohican Nation. This is an effort to spread awareness about the Mohican cultural and historical importance of Papscanee Island in the Hudson River and to combat the threat that the E-37 natural gas pipeline proposal poses on this sacred land. 

For more of Anna’s work, click here.

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