Human Rights Watch Traveling Film Festival – Youth Producing Change

Date/Time
Date(s) - Wednesday 10/22/2008
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

From its inception, Human Rights Watch’s International Film Festival has embodied the power of film to make a difference. Courageous and committed filmmakers produce impressive documentary and feature films, which stimulate passionate conversations about human rights and inspire new generations of human rights activists. Through the universal language of film, we connect the experiences of survivors and activists with our own experiences—a critical step in influencing public opinion and policy makers.

A program of short films directed and produced by youth from across the globe. Armed with digital cameras, computers and their own boundless creativity – these young people bravely expose human rights issues faced by themselves and their communities. It’s time that we listen to what they have to say.

Founding Presenter: Adobe Youth Voices 

Part of iEAR presents!, co-sponsored by the Arts Department at Rensselaer.

 

EVENT SCHEDULE:

4-5:00pm Buffet Reception

5:00pm Youth Producing Change (80 minutes)

7:00pm A Promise to the Dead (92 minutes)

9:00pm To See If I’m Smiling (59 minutes)

 

Reception:

From 4-5 pm, we will be having a reception celebrating local youth media makers. In our Cafe’s computer lab, we will be featuring locally produced videos including works from Sanctuary Summer Camp, Troy School 2, Mountain Road School, Career Links, Grand Street Community Arts, and Moviequest Productions. Join local media makers to launch the evening with a personal touch!

 

Program 1: Youth Producing Change begins at 5pm and runs 80 minutes.

A program of short films directed and produced by youth from across the
globe. Armed with digital cameras, computers and their own boundless
creativity, these young people bravely expose human rights issues faced
by themselves and their communities. It’s time that we listen to what
they have to say.

*Andrew Lynn, Media Alliance Arts & Education Coordinator, will be presenting the 5:00 show, Youth Producing Change.

The Countdown
Rene Dongo, Fast Forward Program at The Institute of Contemporary Art—US—2007—6m—doc
In English

A plane left spoken word artist Sofia Snow’s hometown on September 11th, never reaching its destination. Sofia shares her hope that society can work to fill the empty space left by the tragedy.

Women Empowerment
Lithiko Mthobeli, in collaboration with Siphokazi, Athi, Ongezwa and Daza, Bridges to Understanding – South Africa—2007— 5m—doc
In English

Reflecting on the harsh reality mothers face in raising children alone in their township, these young South African filmmakers celebrate their mothers’ resilience to overcome the obstacles that lay before them.

I Want My Parents Back
Aaron Dominguez, Euniz Gonzalez, Argenis Herrera, Garrett Hayes, Khirye Rice, Melly Jenny, Nathan Villalobos, Omar Flores and Cody Marshall of Media Arts Center San Diego – US/Mexico—2007— 11m—doc
In English and Spanish

The impact of U.S. immigration policies hit home when the undocumented parents of the Munoz family are deported without warning to Mexico, leaving their 3 young American-born children behind.

Islands of the People
Amber Good, Raven Hausman-Hayward, Justin Klevgaard and Jesse Williams of Atira Women’s Resource Society, in partnership with the Old Massett Youth Program – Haida Gwaii, Canada —2007—6m—doc
In English and Haida

Amber Good is a 13-year-old Haida girl with a very important role to play. Facing the dark history of colonization and forced assimilation that nearly wiped out her culture, Amber makes a commitment to learn the Haida language from her grandmother Nonnie Mary Swanson, one of the last living people who can speak, read and write in Haida.

The True Cost of Coal
Brittany Hunsaker, Autumn Nikki King and Willa Johnson of Appalachian Media Institute, Appalshop, Inc. —US —2007 —14m —doc
In English

Coal mining is a way of life and death in Eastern Kentucky. Despite over 100 years of mining, the communities that provide this work force remain some of the most poverty-stricken and contaminated areas in the United States. As energy prices soar and the government and coal companies unite to increase coal extraction, mountain communities rally to protect their rights.

The Hidden Cost of Cashmere
Zane Scheuerlein, Member of Open Yo